Brain Injuries: New Study Finds Even One Concussion Can Have Lasting Effects

The human brainMany of us that deal with these injuries routinely have suspected it, but a new study confirms that even one concussion can have lasting effects.

The study was based on extensive data on the health of people in Sweden.  The researchers found 104,000 people who experienced head injuries between 1973 and 1985.  The researches then looked at the these brain injured persons’ records after their injuries and compared those results with the results and history of the siblings of the brain injured persons.

The researchers found that persons who had even one concussion were more likely to receive future disability payments, more likely to need mental health care, less likely to graduate high school, and much more likely to die prematurely.

The researchers also found that the problems increased significantly if the person had more than one concussion, and if the persons had their head injuries after the age of 15.

The good news is that most of the people who had just one concussion were fine.  But people who have suffered concussions will still have to worry about what their future must hold.

The article also noted that the leading causes of brain injuries are what we see often in our practice.  For the very young, the leading cause of concussions is falls.  For teens, the leading cause becomes sports.  And for adults, the leading cause of brain injuries is car wrecks.

If you or a loved one has experienced a concussion or other brain injury because of another person or business’s carelessness, call us at (512)476-4944.  We will try to help you navigate the difficult process of pursuing your claim.

 

 

 

Brain Injury Symptoms: Neurological Disorders (Seizures, Movement, Fatigue, etc)

The human brainAs I repeatedly tell clients, brain injuries often go undiagnosed following car wrecks or other accidents because doctors don’t usually know you well enough to make a pre-injury and post-injury comparison of your intelligence, emotional well-being, and general personality.  As a result, it’s often up to you or your family members to notice the symptoms of a brain injury and convey those to medical providers so you get the best care possible.  But to do that, you need to know the symptoms of brain injuries.  This series is designed to help you do that.

There are a number of neurological symptoms of brain injuries that, though sometimes rare, can be extremely traumatic for the injured person.  The most common neurological injuries are as follows:

Fatigue.  Fatigue is a very common symptom of people with brain injuries.  Some studies have found that up to 73% of persons with head injuries suffer from fatigue after the injury.   Unfortunately, many of the other symptoms of brain injuries, such as depression, also have a component of fatigue, and fatigue is also a side effect of many medications used to treat other brain injury symptoms.  Thus, treatment of fatigue remains difficult.

Post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy.  Seizures and epilepsy are fairly common symptoms of brain injuries.  Traumatic brain injury accounts for about 5% of all epilepsy cases and is the leading cause of epilepsy in young adults.  The development of seizure or epilepsy symptoms are very dependent on the type of injury sustained.  Many brain injury victims will undergo EEG testing to determine whether or not the patient is having seizures.  It’s important to note that a normal EEG does not mean that you don’t have a brain injury, it only means that you’re not having seizures at the time of the test.

Tremors. Many brain injury victims will develop tremors following their injury.  The most common cause of brain injury tremors is car wrecks where the brain has a history of quick deceleration injuries.

Dystonia (involuntary muscle contractions). Dystonia is a fairly rare, but significant symptom of brain injuries.

Vision problems.  Many brain injured patients have injuries to the optic nerve so the patients experience blurry vision or other changes to their eyesight.  There are other potential causes of sight issues associated with brain injuries that are discussed elsewhere in this series.

Smell problems.  Many brain injuries end up damaging the olfactory nerve so the victim will have an impaired sense of smell.  It is obviously difficult to test for smell issues, and smell is not something you might normally be concerned with after you’re injured, but if you or a loved one mentions smell problems, be alert that it could be related to a brain injury.

Vestibulocochlear nerve problems.  This nerve works on both hearing and balance.  Thus, when it is damaged as part of a brain injury, it can cause problems with hearing and also vertigo symptoms.  Vertigo is very common following a brain injury and a number of our clients have had to undergo vestibular therapy as part of their treatment.

Sleeping disorders.  Sleep-wake disorders and alterations in sleep patterns are very common following brain injuries.   The variety of sleep disorders include insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, narcolepsy, and sleep apnea.  Sleep issues need to be addressed because poor sleep can lead to other health concerns.

 

 

Brain Injury News: Ohio State Football Player Found Dead After Head Injuries

The human brainThere was tragic head injury-related news out of Ohio this weekend.

Yesterday, two individuals sifting through a dumpster in Columbus, Ohio found the body of Ohio State football player Kosta Karageorge, who had apparently committed suicide.

Karageorge had been missing since Wednesday.  Earlier that day, he sent an ominous text message to his mother that his concussions have his head messed up, he left his apartment, and he had not been seen since then until his body was discovered.

I hope that Karageorge’s death is not in vain, but that he serves as a reminder of the importance of getting good mental health care following head injuries.  I often see people who have head injuries get a double dose of the mental anguish problem.

First, people with head injuries experience the confusion and mental health problems that result from the actual injury itself.  These symptoms can be severe and debilitating.

But head injuries are also an invisible problem.  With a broken arm or leg, friends and family members can see the injuries and can understand when you are hurt.  But head injuries aren’t like that.  Often, in addition to going through the stress and emotional consequences of the injury, injured persons also suffer additional emotional trauma from their friends and family members not really understanding that they’re hurt or the extent of their injuries.  This can only compound the problem.

If you or a loved one has sustained a brain injury, learn from this tragedy, and get the therapy or other assistance that you need.

 

 

Concussions — IMPACT Testing For Kids

My son sustained a concussion last spring while playing baseball.  During that process, my son took a test called an IMPACT test to help diagnose the concussion and to help figure out when he had recovered sufficiently to return to normal activities. But our problem was that we didn’t have a baseline.  The IMPACT test works best if the kids have taken a pre-injury test (required by many school athletics departments) to be compared to the post-injury tests.  Since the pre-injury test only costs around $20, I’ve become a big proponent of encouraging kids to take the tests.

Recently, local news station KXAN ran a good story about the tests.  If you have kids, especially those participating in sports, I urge you to watch the story and to have the kids take the test.  You can watch the story below.

 

What Are Symptoms Of A Concussion Or Brain Injury?

I often tell clients that they need to be on the lookout for brain injuries.   For some head injuries, the problems are obvious.  But in many cases, the problems are much more subtle.  As a result, many concussions or brain injuries go undiagnosed because a doctor doesn’t know you well and doesn’t see the symptoms.  Because of this, it’s important for you or your spouse or other family members to look for symptoms so you can convey that information to doctors.

Working on a case, I stumbled across this symptom chart from the Centers for Disease Controls that will help you identify potential brain injuries.  Hopefully, this will help you recognize problems so you can get the treatment and care you need.

Symptoms of concussion

Head Injuries and Concussions — From Players’ Perspective

If you know me, you know I’m a huge University of Texas sports fan.  Because of that, I’m a huge fan of the Longhorn Network.  Usually, the stories just relate to my sports passion, but in light of David Ash’s retirement from football due to his repeated concussions, the LHN ran a great piece that talked with three former UT players about their battles with concussions.

Watching it, one thing that stood out to me was something that we see in our practice (and which the science backs up), and that is, once you have had a concussion (or multiple concussions), it takes a smaller impact to re-injure the brain.  Additionally, with a history of concussions, the symptoms appear to get worse.

If you have any interest in head injuries, concussions or sports, I highly recommend the story below.

NCAA Settles Its Own Concussion Lawsuit

I’ve written often about the lawsuits between the NFL and former professional football players regarding their concussions.  Now, the NCAA is settling (or at least trying to settle) its own lawsuit about sports-related concussions.

Under the proposed class action settlement, the NCAA will fund a $70 million pool of money to pay for former college athletes to undergo testing to determine whether they have brain injuries.  The settlement will also have the NCAA set mandated “return to play” policy that all schools must follow instead of letting each school have its own policy.  This would obviously help protect athletes in the future.

The settlement does not pay the athletes any damages for their concussions.  Instead, the athletes would still have to sue their former schools or other parties to recover those damages.  The test results that the NCAA is funding might be able to play a part in the eventual lawsuits.

This settlement is a long way from being final.  It has to be approved by a judge and there are a number of people who intend to object to the settlement on various grounds.  We’ll try to keep you posted because I think these type of developments are crucial to bringing public light to head injuries and they also help lead to better protocol for all levels of sports, not just colleges.

 

Here’s an ESPN news story about the settlement.

Head Injuries: New Settlement In NFL Concussion Lawsuit

helmet smallYou may recall that the previous settlement agreement between the National Football League and a class of former players was scrapped by the judge, who was concerned that there wouldn’t be enough funds to fully compensate the injured players who sustained head injuries.

Yesterday, the parties entered into a new settlement agreement.  Unlike the last settlement, this settlement isn’t capped at any specific amount.  This ensures that any former player who develops a qualifying neurocognitive condition will be compensated for the injury.

This is an interesting way forward.  Obviously, we represent a number of clients who have sustained head injuries, so I know the ways that these types of injuries can affect someone.  But I’ve also done some work on class actions, and it’s highly unusual to craft a settlement that doesn’t have a cap on the damages.  It will be interesting to see how the case proceeds and whether the ultimate amount paid out will surpass the $765 million that was being set aside in the prior agreement.

Brain Injuries: Invisible Injury

CBS Boston ran a story about one of the Boston Marathon survivors.  Titled “Marathon Bombing Survivor Struggles With ‘Invisible Injury’,” it describes what many of our brain injured clients have to deal with.  If you or a loved one has suffered from a concussion or other brain injury, it’s worth a watch:

 

Great News! Number of High School Athletes With Concussions Doubles

Concussions are on the rise.  New research published in the Journal of Sports Medicine finds that the number of high school athletes who have suffered a concussion has doubled between 2005 to 2012.

This is great news!

Why?

Researchers think the reality is that the number of concussions is the same, but we’re becoming much more aware about the diagnoses.  That is good news.

We’re learning more and more about the potential short and long-term consequences of concussions.  For example, we know more now about second-impact syndrome — if a person has a second head impact (even one not very severe) while the brain still suffers from a head injury, it can lead to severe disability or death.

We’re also learning that for the brain to heal, it needs to rest.  As weird as it sounds, that means no electronics, no television, and limited thinking.  A kid can’t follow these instructions if the concussion isn’t diagnosed.

Unfortunately, I know first hand how important this is.  My son suffered a baseball related concussion in February.  While he’s fine now, it was difficult to see him suffer from the consequences — the headaches, the inability to focus, etc.  Fortunately, we had it diagnosed right away, we got instruction on how to rest his brain, and he healed (after five or so weeks).

Increased awareness can help increased the likelihood of a successful outcome for others as well.

 

If you or a loved one has suffered a concussion in a wreck or accident, please call us at 512-476-4944 to see if we can help.

Perlmutter & Schuelke, PLLC maintains offices in Austin, Texas. However, our attorneys and lawyers represent clients throughout the state of Texas, including Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, Forth Worth, El Paso, New Braunfels, San Marcos, Kyle, Buda, Round Rock, Georgetown, Lockhart, Bastrop, Elgin, Manor, Brenham, Cedar Park, Burnet, Marble Falls, Temple and Killeen. By Brooks Schuelke


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