New Study Explains Why Rest Is Key Following A Brain Injury

brainWhen my son suffered a concussion two years ago, his doctor told him the key was rest.  For this then 11 year old, that meant laying down, with no reading, no television, and no video games.  Just rest.

Rest has long been thought to help following a brain injury, but recently, a new study came out explaining why that was the right advice.

The study, which examined trauma in the brains of mice, found that when there is single, mild incident, the mice lose 10-15 percent of their neuronal connections in the brain, but there was no accompanying cell death.  When the mice rested for three days, almost all of the connections came back, healing the brain.

However, the study found that without rest, when additional events occur, the neuronal connections don’t heal and can become permanent.  Thus, the prescribed rest is critical to offer the brain an opportunity for any mild injuries to heal.

One issue with the study is that it is only based on very mild injuries.  In more severe cases, a one-time incident can cause cell death and have long-term consequences even if the victim tries to take the rest needed or prescribed.

If you or a loved one has suffered a brain injury as a result the conduct of someone else, please call us at (512)476-4944 so we can help you.

 

 

 

Good Brain Injury Related News From The University of Texas

brainYesterday, Admiral William McRaven, the Chancellor of the University of Texas System, made several announcements about his future plans for the system.

Recognizing the increase in brain injuries and diseases, Admiral McRaven proposed an “unprecedented investment” to have the University of Texas academic and health campuses work together on research and initiatives to improve brain health.  Admiral McRaven compared his envisioned level cooperation to that of the Manhattan Project, when researchers all over the country came together to collaborate and create the atomic bomb during World War II.

While this initiative isn’t on the immediate horizon, it’s an exciting prospect to think about the University that I love playing a big part in helping so many of my clients.

Posted on: November 6, 2015 | Tagged

Selfies Killing More People Than Sharks

Selfie stickSelfie danger is on the rise.

In mid-September, a Japanese tourist at the Taj Mahal was taking a picture of himself and fell down stairs, leading to a fatal brain injury.  In early September, a  Houston teenager was killed taking a selfie with a gun.  In August, a man was gored while trying to take a selfie during a Spanish bull run.

The website Mashable was so intrigued by the rise that they tried to compare selfie deaths to shark-related deaths.  To their surprise, so far in 2015, more people have died from selfie-related incidents (12) than from shark attacks (8).  This difference is actually likely to be bigger since selfie deaths aren’t easily tracked.

While the stories sound a little humorous, this is a serious problem.  Many places are banning selfie sticks (including the Texas State Fair, for those of you planning on venturing up there), Waterton Canyon park in Colorado has closed because people can’t stop taking selfies with bears, and the Russian interior ministry is even launching a campaign to encourage safer selfie practices.

Instead of taking a selfie, making the next time you need a picture, do it the old fashioned way — ask for help from someone around.

 

 

Posted on: September 25, 2015 | Tagged

Energy Drinks Linked To Brain Injuries

brainA new University of Toronto study found that teenagers who drink heavily caffeinated energy drinks are more prone to traumatic brain injuries.

In the firm, I see brain injuries in all sorts of situations — car wrecks, bicycle accidents, falls, etc.  But for teenagers, the most common cause of traumatic brain injuries is sports.  The rate of brain injuries in teens has been on a rise (in part, I think, because of better diagnoses).

The new study sheds some additional light on the problem.  The researchers interviewed 10,000 people from ages 11-20 and asked a series of questions, including questions about usage of energy drinks and their incidents of brain injuries.  The results were startling.

Those kids who had consumed one energy drink in the last year were twice as likely to have suffered a brain injury and non-drinkers, and those kids who consumed five or more energy drinks in the last week were nearly seven times more likely to have sustained a brain injury.

These results don’t necessarily show that the use of energy drinks makes a person more likely to suffer a brain injury from an event.  But it’s possible.  The high caffeine levels affect the brain in ways that we don’t know, and the caffeine levels could make the brain more susceptible to injury.  More study is needed there.

Alternatively, there is some thought that there is a correlation between the use of energy drinks and high risk behavior.  Maybe people who drink energy drinks engage in activities that are more dangerous than what a typical kid experiences.

Finally, there is the possibility that the use of energy drinks is a coping mechanism to deal with the after-effects of brain injuries.  Many kids with brain injuries describe themselves as being tired or in a fog.  Perhaps the usage of energy drinks is a way to fight off those symptoms.

There is still a lot to learn on these topics, but there is enough concern that I think we should discourage the use of these energy drinks by kids until we know that they’re safe.

Hope After Brain Injury Video

Here’s a good video trying to explain some of the things that brain injury victims go through.  Unfortunately, too many of my clients go through this.

 

 

Brain Injury Symptoms: Balance, Dizziness, Smelling, Hearing & Sight

The human brainAs I repeatedly tell clients, brain injuries often go undiagnosed following car wrecks or other accidents because doctors don’t usually know you well enough to make a pre-injury and post-injury comparison of your intelligence, emotional well-being, and general personality.  As a result, it’s often up to you or your family members to notice the symptoms of a brain injury and convey those to medical providers so you get the best care possible.  But to do that, you need to know the symptoms of brain injuries.  This series is designed to help you do that.

These are the final common symptoms on my list.  They seem unrelated, but they’re all related to a change in the senses.

Balance & Dizziness Issues.  Unfortunately, many  of you may experience balance or dizziness issues following your brain injury.  These are very common symptoms of brain injuries and sometimes they can be severe.  Some with brain injuries can feel the immediate problems, but tests can help make the diagnoses.  (With my son’s concussion, he appeared healed and ready to return to baseball until his medical provider ran balance tests on him, which revealed he was still experiencing significant problems despite seeming normal.)  For persons with severe cases of balance and dizziness issues, the person can undergo vestibular therapy that can help fight these symptoms.

Smelling & Tasting.  Oddly enough, many victims of brain injuries experience problems with their sense of smell and taste.  These can run the gamut from completely losing the ability to smell or taste, to a decreased ability to do both, to always experiencing a foul or unpleasant taste or smell.  Unfortunately, there is little that can be done in many of these cases.

Hearing.  Some studies suggest that between 48 and 74% of all people who sustain head trauma will have some type of hearing loss.  These losses could be caused by actual damage to the hearing system (ear canal, etc.) to neurologic problems that are a result of damage to the brain itself.  The treatment options obviously change based on the type and severity of the injury sustained.

Vision.  Recent studies at some VA hospitals have found that more than 74% of the patients with brain injuries had vision problems.  There can be a number of different causes of vision problems.  There can also be a number of different treatment options ranging from waiting, to patching one of your eyes, to vision therapy, to surgery.

Brain Injury Symptoms: Speech and Language Problems

The human brainAs I repeatedly tell clients, brain injuries often go undiagnosed following car wrecks or other accidents because doctors don’t usually know you well enough to make a pre-injury and post-injury comparison of your intelligence, emotional well-being, and general personality.  As a result, it’s often up to you or your family members to notice the symptoms of a brain injury and convey those to medical providers so you get the best care possible.  But to do that, you need to know the symptoms of brain injuries.  This series is designed to help you do that.

Unfortunately,  brain injuries often affect a victim’s ability to communicate.  These are not only scary problems to encounter, but they can greatly affect the victim’s quality of life going forward.  Some of these issues are as follows:

Cognitive issues.  Many victims find their communication problems resulting from cognitive issues such as problems with word recall, inability to tell stories or other thoughts in sequence, or difficulty understanding more complex thoughts or expressions.  There are often some coping strategies that can be used to help with these problems.

Slurring or other speech problems. Another common problem is slurring of speech.  Technically, brain injury patients can develop a motor speech disorder called dysarthia.  The symptoms of dysarthia may be slurred or choppy speech, slow rate of speech, inability to fully move mouth, tongue and jaw, and other changes in voice quality.  These are obviously scary problems, but they can often be treated with speech therapy.

Swallowing problems.  Though not a true communication problem, a somewhat related symptom is swallowing problems.  Many victims of head injury develop issues with swallowing.  This is obviously not a symptom that you would normally associate with brain injuries, but it is one that you can easily recognize if you’re looking for it.

Brain Injury Symptoms: Pain Disorders

The human brainAs I repeatedly tell clients, brain injuries often go undiagnosed following car wrecks or other accidents because doctors don’t usually know you well enough to make a pre-injury and post-injury comparison of your intelligence, emotional well-being, and general personality.  As a result, it’s often up to you or your family members to notice the symptoms of a brain injury and convey those to medical providers so you get the best care possible.  But to do that, you need to know the symptoms of brain injuries.  This series is designed to help you do that.

Problems with pain are common following brain injuries.

Headache.  Perhaps the most common symptom of a brain injury is a headache.  Symptoms can range from routine post-traumatic headaches to post-traumatic migraines.  The severity of the headache and the duration of the symptoms depends on the severity of the injury and the type of head injury sustained.

Neuropathic pain.  Neuropathic pain is a condition caused by injuries to the nervous system.    This is hard to describe, but the nerves are excited so pain is prevalent.  This pain may be treated by medication.

Central pain syndrome.  Central pain syndrome is pain that follows lesions to the central nervous system.  If the brain develops lesions from the brain injury, then central pain syndrome may develop.

Brain Injury Symptoms: Neurological Disorders (Seizures, Movement, Fatigue, etc)

The human brainAs I repeatedly tell clients, brain injuries often go undiagnosed following car wrecks or other accidents because doctors don’t usually know you well enough to make a pre-injury and post-injury comparison of your intelligence, emotional well-being, and general personality.  As a result, it’s often up to you or your family members to notice the symptoms of a brain injury and convey those to medical providers so you get the best care possible.  But to do that, you need to know the symptoms of brain injuries.  This series is designed to help you do that.

There are a number of neurological symptoms of brain injuries that, though sometimes rare, can be extremely traumatic for the injured person.  The most common neurological injuries are as follows:

Fatigue.  Fatigue is a very common symptom of people with brain injuries.  Some studies have found that up to 73% of persons with head injuries suffer from fatigue after the injury.   Unfortunately, many of the other symptoms of brain injuries, such as depression, also have a component of fatigue, and fatigue is also a side effect of many medications used to treat other brain injury symptoms.  Thus, treatment of fatigue remains difficult.

Post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy.  Seizures and epilepsy are fairly common symptoms of brain injuries.  Traumatic brain injury accounts for about 5% of all epilepsy cases and is the leading cause of epilepsy in young adults.  The development of seizure or epilepsy symptoms are very dependent on the type of injury sustained.  Many brain injury victims will undergo EEG testing to determine whether or not the patient is having seizures.  It’s important to note that a normal EEG does not mean that you don’t have a brain injury, it only means that you’re not having seizures at the time of the test.

Tremors. Many brain injury victims will develop tremors following their injury.  The most common cause of brain injury tremors is car wrecks where the brain has a history of quick deceleration injuries.

Dystonia (involuntary muscle contractions). Dystonia is a fairly rare, but significant symptom of brain injuries.

Vision problems.  Many brain injured patients have injuries to the optic nerve so the patients experience blurry vision or other changes to their eyesight.  There are other potential causes of sight issues associated with brain injuries that are discussed elsewhere in this series.

Smell problems.  Many brain injuries end up damaging the olfactory nerve so the victim will have an impaired sense of smell.  It is obviously difficult to test for smell issues, and smell is not something you might normally be concerned with after you’re injured, but if you or a loved one mentions smell problems, be alert that it could be related to a brain injury.

Vestibulocochlear nerve problems.  This nerve works on both hearing and balance.  Thus, when it is damaged as part of a brain injury, it can cause problems with hearing and also vertigo symptoms.  Vertigo is very common following a brain injury and a number of our clients have had to undergo vestibular therapy as part of their treatment.

Sleeping disorders.  Sleep-wake disorders and alterations in sleep patterns are very common following brain injuries.   The variety of sleep disorders include insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, narcolepsy, and sleep apnea.  Sleep issues need to be addressed because poor sleep can lead to other health concerns.

 

 

Brain Injury Symptoms: Behavioral and Emotional Symptoms

The human brain

INTRODUCTION

As I repeatedly tell clients, brain injuries often go undiagnosed following car wrecks or other accidents because doctors don’t usually know you well enough to make a pre-injury and post-injury comparison of your intelligence, emotional well-being, and general personality.  As a result, it’s often up to you or your family members to notice the symptoms of a brain injury and convey those to medical providers so you get the best care possible.  But to do that, you need to know the symptoms of brain injuries.  This series is designed to help you do that.

You may only realize that you or a family member has a brain injury because you notice changes in you or your family member’s behavior or emotional status.  Some of the common emotional or behavioral issues that we see from brain injuries are as follows:

Irritability.  Many survivors or friends of survivors find that the injured person is more irritable and much more easily angered.  The injured person may also have an angry response to a situation that is greatly out of proportion to what you would normally expect.

Impulsivity.  Many brain injury survivors have problems with impulse control.  They say things they wouldn’t normally say; they take physical actions they wouldn’t normally take; or they demonstrate poor judgment failing to fully think things out.

Affective instability.  Many persons with brain injuries show exaggerated displays of emotion that are way out of proportion to the situation or to the person’s pre-injury self.  As mentioned above, some persons become explosively angry at something that doesn’t seem justified.  Others may become extremely sad over something that doesn’t warrant such a response.

Apathy/Lack of Motivation.  Apathy is very common in persons with brain injuries.  One study has found that more than 60% of brain injury victims suffer some form of apathy.

Depression.  Some studies find that between 30 and 60 percent of brain injury victims have depression.  This doesn’t include the significant percentage of victims who experience some symptoms of depression, but not enough for a formal diagnoses.  Additionally, if victims had depression prior to their injury, a brain injury can make that depression much more severe.

Psychosis.  Psychosis is an infrequent (but high impact) occurrence with brain injuries.  Typical symptoms of psychosis might be delusions, hallucinations, or schizophrenia-like problems.  As I said, these are rare problems in brain injuries, but when they occur, they are very problematic for the affected person.

General Anxiety Disorder. Many brain injury victims describe feelings of anxiety.  If a person has experience anxiety before their injury, then they are much more likely to experience even worse anxiety after the injury.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.  A small percentage of brain injury victims develop OCD after their injury.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.  There are a number of studies finding that victims of brain injuries are also likely to experience PTSD.  This is a problem that is being highlighted by the experiences of our soldiers in the middle east conflicts.  PTSD is also problematic because it makes recovery much more difficult.

Substance Abuse.  Several studies find that victims of brain injuries are much more likely to experience substance use disorders.

Dementia.  There are substantial studies finding that brain injuries both increase the likelihood that the victim develops dementia and also may result in earlier-onset dementia for those who are already pre-disposed to developing dementia.

 

Perlmutter & Schuelke, PLLC maintains offices in Austin, Texas. However, our attorneys and lawyers represent clients throughout the state of Texas, including Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, Forth Worth, El Paso, New Braunfels, San Marcos, Kyle, Buda, Round Rock, Georgetown, Lockhart, Bastrop, Elgin, Manor, Brenham, Cedar Park, Burnet, Marble Falls, Temple and Killeen. By Brooks Schuelke


Law Firm Website by CLM Grow