My MRI or CT Scan Was Negative. Does This Mean I Don’t Have A Brain Injury?

This is another question I’ve recently received from potential clients.  They were involved in an incident — a car wreck, a slip and fall, or something similar.  They went to the ER, and the ER performed an MRI or a CT san looking for problems, but scan came back negative.  Does this mean that the was no brain injury?

Absolutely not.

While an MRI or a CT scan can find some brain bleeds or some damage, they don’t find most problems.  As a result, the vast majority of people who have brain injuries have a normal (what we call negative) MRI or CT scan.

Indeed, while insurance companies sometimes try to argue about claims when you have a normal MRI or CT scan, virtually all scientific literature and all neurologists agree that you can still have a normal scan.  Not only that, virtually all neurologists will agree that most of the patients they see for brain injuries have normal scans.

So if you feel like you’re off or your family members are telling you that you’re different after a car wreck, a fall, or another event, don’t rule out a possible brain injury just because you had a normal CT scan or MRI.  You may very well still have a mild traumatic brain injury that needs to be treated

The Emergency Room Didn’t Say Anything About A Concussion. Does That Mean I Don’t Have A Brain Injury?

This is a question I’ve seemed to be answering for clients lately.  You are in a wreck or other event.  You go to the emergency room.  They look you over, they never say anything about a brain injury, and they send you home.  Does this mean you don’t have some type of brain injury?

Absolutely not.

Emergency rooms (and even other doctors) are notoriously bad at diagnosing brain injuries.  Why is that?

First, emergency rooms are triage facilities.  They are only really looking for the things that are life-threatening or need to be treated immediately.  Too often, this means that they don’t look for brain injuries unless the brain injury is the type that’s completely obvious.

Second, emergency rooms (and most other doctors) don’t know you.  For the most part, there’s not a readily available test that we can use during a doctor’s visit to say whether you have a brain injury.  The first time a brain injury is diagnosed is usually based on your complaints of your symptoms and comparisons of how you were before you got hurt to how you are after you got hurt.  Doctors can compare your symptoms to common brain injury symptoms, but the doctors have to be looking to put two and two together.  And doctors usually don’t know you well enough to compare your condition from before the wreck to your condition after the wreck.  As a result, it’s often difficult for a doctor to make the diagnoses of a brain injury.

That’s why I tell clients that it’s so important to have friends and family members look for changes in your condition or behavior.  For our clients, we have forms that we give you to fill out that can help figure out what problems you’re having.  That way, you’ll be in a better position to articulate to your doctor the problems you’re having and the doctor can more easily and quickly make a referral to a neurologist or other treating physician.

Brain Injuries: New Study Finds Even One Concussion Can Have Lasting Effects

The human brainMany of us that deal with these injuries routinely have suspected it, but a new study confirms that even one concussion can have lasting effects.

The study was based on extensive data on the health of people in Sweden.  The researchers found 104,000 people who experienced head injuries between 1973 and 1985.  The researches then looked at the these brain injured persons’ records after their injuries and compared those results with the results and history of the siblings of the brain injured persons.

The researchers found that persons who had even one concussion were more likely to receive future disability payments, more likely to need mental health care, less likely to graduate high school, and much more likely to die prematurely.

The researchers also found that the problems increased significantly if the person had more than one concussion, and if the persons had their head injuries after the age of 15.

The good news is that most of the people who had just one concussion were fine.  But people who have suffered concussions will still have to worry about what their future must hold.

The article also noted that the leading causes of brain injuries are what we see often in our practice.  For the very young, the leading cause of concussions is falls.  For teens, the leading cause becomes sports.  And for adults, the leading cause of brain injuries is car wrecks.

If you or a loved one has experienced a concussion or other brain injury because of another person or business’s carelessness, call us at (512)476-4944.  We will try to help you navigate the difficult process of pursuing your claim.

 

 

 

Brain Injuries: Risk Of Suicide May Increase Three Fold After A Concussion

brainI’m part of a nation-wide group of lawyers who regularly exchange articles and other information with one another about brain injury cases.

This week, we were having an online discussion about suicide, and we shared a study from earlier this year finding that persons who have suffered even a single concussion may be at a much higher risk for suicide.

What really struck me is how these risks apply to my clients.

In a Scientific American article about the study, Dr. Donald Redelmeier, one of the study’s lead authors stated:

The typical patient I see is a middle-aged adult, not elite athlete.  And the usual circumstances for acquiring a concussion are not while playing football; it is when driving in traffic and getting into a crash, when missing a step and falling down a staircase, when getting overly ambitious about home repairs — the everyday activities of life.

These are the things we routinely see in our practice. Over the last year, I’ve represented clients who have had brain injuries in car wrecks, bicycle wrecks, slip-and-fall accidents, and more.

Too often the diagnoses of these injuries is slow, and in many cases, not recognized until very late in the process.   This delays the treatment, including the psychological treatment, that clients need to help them start the road to recovery from these devastating injuries.

 

Playground Concussions Are On The Rise

brainOne of the recent headlines on Yahoo News was a story that playground concussions are on the rise.

You might be surprised to find that I think this is great news.  Why?

I don’t think the actual number of concussions are rising.  Instead, I think parents and school nurses and such are getting much better at looking for and diagnosing concussions.

This diagnoses is important.  I not only see kids affected with brain injuries in my practice, but I’ve watched my own kid struggle with a concussion.

These are serious injuries that need to be treated seriously.  But they can’t be properly treated if they’re not diagnosed.

There are also potential legal aspects in these claims.  For example, depending on the circumstances, a playground injury may give rise to a claim or lawsuit against:

  • the party that owned the playground
  • the party who designed the playground
  • the party who built the playground
  • the party who was responsible for maintaining the playground
  • the party who made modifications to the playground

If your kid is hurt on a playground, the first order of business is to make sure they get the care they need.  After that, if the problems are serious, then talk to a lawyer to discuss your options.

Unprecedented Actions: HoverBoard Industry Is Deemed Unsafe

Last Thursday, the Consumer Product Safety Commission took the unprecented step of sending a letter to all hoverboard manufacturers, importers and retailing telling them that all hoverboards are potentially unsafe.  One major manufacturer, Swagway, has also told people who own its hoverboards to quit using them until they are deemed safe.

This is a shocking turn of events.  Two months ago, hoverboards were among the most popular Christmas gifts, and now the entire industry is in a bit of turmoil.

There were a couple of things that were very interesting about this to me.  First, in the letter, the CPSC declares that no manufacturer in the industry meets the CPSC’s safety standards.  This is amazing.  I can’t think of another instance off the top of my head where the government has declared an entire industry unsafe.

Second, the reason provided by the CPSC was also interesting.  The CPSC declared hoverboards unsafe because of their risk of fires caused by the batteries.  This is certainly a known risk, but in my mind, not the greatest risk.

For me, the most significant risk from hoverboards is the risk of falls and related injuries.  There have been hundreds of reports of people falling off of their hoverboards and incurring significant injuries, including numerous brain injuries and fractures of various bones.  Those types of injuries have the potential to be permanently life-altering.

I don’t know how this will turn out.  At some point, after more testing is done, perhaps the government will declare that some hoverboards are safe.  But we’re clearly not at that point yet.

 

 

New Study Explains Why Rest Is Key Following A Brain Injury

brainWhen my son suffered a concussion two years ago, his doctor told him the key was rest.  For this then 11 year old, that meant laying down, with no reading, no television, and no video games.  Just rest.

Rest has long been thought to help following a brain injury, but recently, a new study came out explaining why that was the right advice.

The study, which examined trauma in the brains of mice, found that when there is single, mild incident, the mice lose 10-15 percent of their neuronal connections in the brain, but there was no accompanying cell death.  When the mice rested for three days, almost all of the connections came back, healing the brain.

However, the study found that without rest, when additional events occur, the neuronal connections don’t heal and can become permanent.  Thus, the prescribed rest is critical to offer the brain an opportunity for any mild injuries to heal.

One issue with the study is that it is only based on very mild injuries.  In more severe cases, a one-time incident can cause cell death and have long-term consequences even if the victim tries to take the rest needed or prescribed.

If you or a loved one has suffered a brain injury as a result the conduct of someone else, please call us at (512)476-4944 so we can help you.

 

 

 

Good Brain Injury Related News From The University of Texas

brainYesterday, Admiral William McRaven, the Chancellor of the University of Texas System, made several announcements about his future plans for the system.

Recognizing the increase in brain injuries and diseases, Admiral McRaven proposed an “unprecedented investment” to have the University of Texas academic and health campuses work together on research and initiatives to improve brain health.  Admiral McRaven compared his envisioned level cooperation to that of the Manhattan Project, when researchers all over the country came together to collaborate and create the atomic bomb during World War II.

While this initiative isn’t on the immediate horizon, it’s an exciting prospect to think about the University that I love playing a big part in helping so many of my clients.

Posted on: November 6, 2015 | Tagged

Energy Drinks Linked To Brain Injuries

brainA new University of Toronto study found that teenagers who drink heavily caffeinated energy drinks are more prone to traumatic brain injuries.

In the firm, I see brain injuries in all sorts of situations — car wrecks, bicycle accidents, falls, etc.  But for teenagers, the most common cause of traumatic brain injuries is sports.  The rate of brain injuries in teens has been on a rise (in part, I think, because of better diagnoses).

The new study sheds some additional light on the problem.  The researchers interviewed 10,000 people from ages 11-20 and asked a series of questions, including questions about usage of energy drinks and their incidents of brain injuries.  The results were startling.

Those kids who had consumed one energy drink in the last year were twice as likely to have suffered a brain injury and non-drinkers, and those kids who consumed five or more energy drinks in the last week were nearly seven times more likely to have sustained a brain injury.

These results don’t necessarily show that the use of energy drinks makes a person more likely to suffer a brain injury from an event.  But it’s possible.  The high caffeine levels affect the brain in ways that we don’t know, and the caffeine levels could make the brain more susceptible to injury.  More study is needed there.

Alternatively, there is some thought that there is a correlation between the use of energy drinks and high risk behavior.  Maybe people who drink energy drinks engage in activities that are more dangerous than what a typical kid experiences.

Finally, there is the possibility that the use of energy drinks is a coping mechanism to deal with the after-effects of brain injuries.  Many kids with brain injuries describe themselves as being tired or in a fog.  Perhaps the usage of energy drinks is a way to fight off those symptoms.

There is still a lot to learn on these topics, but there is enough concern that I think we should discourage the use of these energy drinks by kids until we know that they’re safe.

New Baseball Study Shows Even When Brain Injured People Appear “Normal”, They’re Not

baseball2I recently saw a study that is near and dear to my heart on two subjects — baseball and concussions.

One of the biggest frustrations of people with head injuries is that even though they look normal to their friends and family members, something is off.  Now, a new study involving professional baseball players provides a strong example of how people are impaired even though they look (and even feel) normal.

The study, reported in the American Journal of Sports Medicine and summarized in the New York Times, followed Major League Baseball position players (non-pitchers) who returned to action following concussions.  What the researchers found was stunning.  These batters, even though they themselves felt they were no longer impaired, performed significantly worse in the weeks following their return to play.

The study looked at 66 players over several years who had concussions.  In the two weeks before their concussions, they players had an average batting average of .249, an on-base percentage of .315, and a slugging percentage of .393.  For the two weeks after their return from the injury, the batting average had dropped to .227, on-base percentage had fallen to .287, and slugging percentage had fallen to .347.

Despite these players feeling that they were fine and back to normal, their batting averages and on-base percentages had each fallen by almost 9%, and their slugging percentages had fallen by almost 12%.

In order to rule out the idea that the drop off was just from the players being away from the game, the researchers also studied players who had taken a similar amount of time off for bereavement or paternity leave.  For those players, the batting averages, on-base average, and slugging percentages all INCREASED after their breaks.

This study is strong evidence for two things:

1) even though victims of brain injuries may appear normal to the outside world, they may still be impaired; and

2) that victims of concussions and head injuries are likely impaired in all types of ways for far longer than even the injured persons suspect.

Perlmutter & Schuelke, PLLC maintains offices in Austin, Texas. However, our attorneys and lawyers represent clients throughout the state of Texas, including Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, Forth Worth, El Paso, New Braunfels, San Marcos, Kyle, Buda, Round Rock, Georgetown, Lockhart, Bastrop, Elgin, Manor, Brenham, Cedar Park, Burnet, Marble Falls, Temple and Killeen. By Brooks Schuelke


Law Firm Website by CLM Grow