What Is A Life Care Planner?

Many of our more serious cases require a life care planner.

A life care planner is an expert witness, usually a doctor or nurse or combination of the two, who sets out the likely care that you’ll need for the rest of your life.  It can include things such as surgeries, physical therapy, follow up doctor care, and accommodations (walkers, shower stools, etc as applicable) that you will need.

The life care planner then estimates the costs of this care throughout your life.

Life care planners are very useful because they can give you a holistic view of your injuries and prognosis that covers a number of different disciplines.  In the non-litigation world, these experts are often seen as case managers — coordinating your care among the different types of doctors that you have to see.

The downside of life care planners is that, like other experts, they can be extremely expensive.  Before hiring one, we’ll have to make a decision about whether the expense can be justified.

The Failure of Tort Reform

Steve Cohen has an interesting article, On Tort Reform, It’s Time To Declare Victory and Withdraw, detailing the failings of tort reform in the medical malpractice context.  In his article, Steve outlines some of the things we’ve learned since tort reform started passing in waves, including in Texas:

1) Tort reform hasn’t decreased healthcare costs.  The theory was that doctors afraid of getting sued were prescribing all kinds of unnecessary tests.  In fact, studies have shown that doctors in states that have enacted tort reform measures prescribe tests at the same rate as those that haven’t had tort reform measures.

2) Runaway juries aren’t a real problem.  Indeed, the data suggests that the average jury awards in medical malpractice cases are significantly lower than the average awards handed down by judges.  If anything, juries are conservative on these cases.

3) Tort reform hasn’t significantly decreased the cost of insurance for doctors, though in states with tort reform measures the increases in rates have been slightly lower than the increases in states without tort reform.

What has happened since tort reform?  Insurance company profits have skyrocketed.  That’s who has really benefited from tort reform.

Unfortunately, in Texas and other states, while trying to craft tort reform for medical malpractice cases, the reforms have bled into other areas of claims, and have hurt the rights of most injured persons and businesses.

With tort reform proven to be a failure, it’s time to make sure it stops.

I’ve Been Injured In A Water Park Or An Amusement Park? Can I Sue Or Make A Claim?

Roller Coaster2 It’s that time a year again.  Almost like clockwork, as soon as school is out, I get inquiries from people like you asking whether you can make a claim against a water park or an amusement park after you get injured.

And the answer is generally yes.  If you’re injured at a water park or an amusement park there are typically several times of claims that you can make.  First, you can make a regular negligence claim arguing that the park’s conduct fell below the standard of care.  In other words, you’re arguing that you were hurt because the park did something it wasn’t supposed to do or that it didn’t do something that it should have done.  There are literally thousands of different variations on this that could lead to claims.

You may also have a products liability claim against the park.  These claims occur when you’re hurt because something with the ride itself goes wrong.  Again, there could be thousands of different possibilities here.  A safety device might not work, the ride might not run as it was designed to do, etc.

There are other claims that might arise based on your particular situation.

And even if you don’t have a claim, many parks have medical payments insurance.  This medical payments coverage pays for medical bills incurred as a result of an incident at the park even if the incident wasn’t the park’s fault.  The limits on these claims are smaller — often around $2,500.00 — but those funds can be helpful when you’re paying out of pocket for medical care.

If you or a loved one has been injured in a water park or amusement park incident, feel free to call us at (512)476-4944.

Drivers Aren’t Being Smart With Their Smart Phones

Avoid-texting-while-drivingAT&T released the results of a scary study this week finding that smart phones are allowing people to drive while distracted in new and “creative” ways.

According to the study:

  • 61% of drivers surveyed admitted that they text and drive
  • 33% admitted emailing while driving
  • 28% admitted surfing the internet while driving
  • 27% admitted using Facebook while driving
  • 17% admitted snapping a photo or selfie while driving
  • 14% admitted using Twitter while driving
  • 14% admitted using Instagram while driving
  • 12% admitted shooting video while driving
  • 11% admitted using Snapchat while driving
  • 10% admitted using video chat while driving

This is obviously a concerning trend.  As we find more and more uses for smartphones, it appears that we’re also creating more and more ways to drive in a distracted manner.

That’s bad news for all of us.

 

 

Do Self-Driving Cars Need Driver’s Ed?

I’ve been following the stories of self-driving cars.  As a personal injury lawyer who sees the devastation of car wrecks, I’m interested in technology that can help my clients be more safe.  On the other hand, knowing all the calculations that go into safe driving — watching for other cars, pedestrians, bicyclists, animals, and other risks — I’ve wondered how technology would be able to handle all of those risks.

Well, it looks like we might still have a ways to go.  Google and other companies have been testing nearly 50 self-driving cars around California.  Reports earlier this week confirmed that, since September, the self-driving cars had been involved in four accidents.  While that might not sound like a lot, if four out of every 50 cars on the roads were involved in wrecks during that same period, it would be catastrophic.

The companies aren’t releasing many details of the wrecks, but reports indicate that two of the wrecks occurred while the cars were in self-driving mode and two occurred while the drivers controlled the cars.

We’ll see how this technology develops going forward.

Posted on: May 12, 2015 | Tagged

What Will It Take To Get A State-Wide Ban On Texting While Driving?

Earlier this week, families who have been destroyed by texting while driving wrecks came to Austin to urge state lawmakers to adopt a state-wide texting while driving ban.  Unfortunately, they’re not alone.  Stories like those shared by these families have been repeated over and over and over.

There is no dispute that texting while driving is dangerous.  Studies have even shown that it’s more dangerous than drinking while driving.  You would think that a state-wide ban would be a no-brainer.

But apparently it’s not.  Some legislators argue that a ban would be an unnecessary invasion into people’s rights.  Are you kidding me?  Is the speed limit an unnecessary invasion?  Are laws against DWI an unnecessary invasion?  Texting while driving is just as dangerous, if not more dangerous, and we need to be doing what we can to protect our kids and families.  Will a ban stop texting while driving?  No.  But it will help, and that’s better than nothing.

You should watch the stories of these families below.

 

Sorry For The Lack Of Updates

I know it’s been over a month since I have posted to the site.  But as a trial lawyer, I’ve been busy actually getting ready for trials.  You might think that’s normal, except it’s not.  I recently read a study that most lawyers who call themselves litigators have not had more than one jury trial.  That’s ridiculous.

We are fairly regular at having trials, but  for the last six weeks, I have had three trial settings set in a six week period.  That’s overwhelming and has prevented me from doing things like posting to the site.  Unfortunately, due to scheduling issues, two of the three have been moved and will likely be tried later, but we had to do all of the work to prepare just in case we went forward.

Posted on: May 8, 2015 |

Teaching Teen Drivers

Articles about teen drivers seem to be in the news (or maybe because I’m teaching my own teen to drive, I’m just noticing the articles more).  Regardless, there were two recent articles I saw that probably interest you if you have a teen driver.

The first reports on a study that finds that 60% of teen driver wrecks result from distractions.  This is probably not a surprise to any of us.  But the study was noteworthy for me because of the way it was conducted — the AAA Foundation watched nearly 1,700 in-car videos of teen drivers who were involved in wrecks to diagnose what the teens were doing immediately prior to the wreck.  The two biggest factors were talking to others in the car and using a cell phone, either for talking or for texting.  If you click the link, there is a video story that shows some of the video excerpts from the wrecks.  This is certainly something I’m going to make my teen driver watch.  Passing on this type of information should be of what we teach our kids.

The second article is a Wall Street Journal article entitled Better Ways To Teach Teen Drivers.  The story is based on a 2014 study that placed video cameras in parents’ cars to review what they were teaching their kids.  The analysis found that, by and large, teens are being properly taught the mechanics of driving — how to turn, how to control speed, etc.   Unfortunately, the study found that parents did not do a good job of teaching teens accident avoidance — how to recognize hazards, how to avoid those hazards, etc.

The best line in the article was discussing the fact that parents spend a lot of time on things they had trouble with, such as parallel parking.  But as the story noted, “Most people don’t get killed parallel parking.”  Instead, the article encourages parents to spend more time working on hazard recognition and judgment — making left turns into oncoming traffic, how to merge on and off highways at high speed, etc.  The article also encourages you to work with your kid in bad weather conditions, in crowded roads, and the like so that the teens’ first time experiencing these things are not while they are alone.

It pains me to give credit to an insurance company, but State Farm has a teen driving program called Road Trips on its teen driving website, http://teendriving.statefarm.com, that can help you with the process.  The website also has a 3-d video tool that helps kids learn to scan for hazards as they’re driving.

 

 

New Baseball Study Shows Even When Brain Injured People Appear “Normal”, They’re Not

baseball2I recently saw a study that is near and dear to my heart on two subjects — baseball and concussions.

One of the biggest frustrations of people with head injuries is that even though they look normal to their friends and family members, something is off.  Now, a new study involving professional baseball players provides a strong example of how people are impaired even though they look (and even feel) normal.

The study, reported in the American Journal of Sports Medicine and summarized in the New York Times, followed Major League Baseball position players (non-pitchers) who returned to action following concussions.  What the researchers found was stunning.  These batters, even though they themselves felt they were no longer impaired, performed significantly worse in the weeks following their return to play.

The study looked at 66 players over several years who had concussions.  In the two weeks before their concussions, they players had an average batting average of .249, an on-base percentage of .315, and a slugging percentage of .393.  For the two weeks after their return from the injury, the batting average had dropped to .227, on-base percentage had fallen to .287, and slugging percentage had fallen to .347.

Despite these players feeling that they were fine and back to normal, their batting averages and on-base percentages had each fallen by almost 9%, and their slugging percentages had fallen by almost 12%.

In order to rule out the idea that the drop off was just from the players being away from the game, the researchers also studied players who had taken a similar amount of time off for bereavement or paternity leave.  For those players, the batting averages, on-base average, and slugging percentages all INCREASED after their breaks.

This study is strong evidence for two things:

1) even though victims of brain injuries may appear normal to the outside world, they may still be impaired; and

2) that victims of concussions and head injuries are likely impaired in all types of ways for far longer than even the injured persons suspect.

Hope After Brain Injury Video

Here’s a good video trying to explain some of the things that brain injury victims go through.  Unfortunately, too many of my clients go through this.

 

 

Perlmutter & Schuelke, PLLC maintains offices in Austin, Texas. However, our attorneys and lawyers represent clients throughout the state of Texas, including Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, Forth Worth, El Paso, New Braunfels, San Marcos, Kyle, Buda, Round Rock, Georgetown, Lockhart, Bastrop, Elgin, Manor, Brenham, Cedar Park, Burnet, Marble Falls, Temple and Killeen. By Brooks Schuelke

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